EUROZONE SLOWS TO A SNAIL’S PACE

The Eurozone economy has posted appalling growth figures for the months July to September with a growth of just 0.1% which is a decrease of 0.2% from the previous three months to that. This poor figures has marked only the second month which the Eurozone has posted a positive number, prior to which was an 18 month long recession which saw trade in the euro are contract month on month. The figure as well as showing further negativity, reveals the sensitivity of the recovery as well as the length of time it will take for the economic trade block to fully recover.

The European economy as a whole is taking a lot longer that expected to bounce back from the financial crisis in comparison to the other regions which suffered from the crash of 2008. With the Euro area having debt problems which bare similarities to those of the United Kingdom and the United States of America, for many of the Member States the debt level has a more political importance than its financial meaning.

Those less powerful members of the trade block have been bailed on unfavourable terms with conditions which lead to government cuts in spending with the overall objective to reduce the country’s debts. The implementation of such money saving policies have adversely affected voters who have been the victims of reduction in wages, an increase in taxes as well as job-cuts and changes to the provision of public services. The economic prospects for the Eurozone appear negative for the near future according to several economists who with high unemployment and a decrease in overall living standards cannot see now the economy can be driven to progression.

Nevertheless, a somewhat optimistic projection has been made for next year by the European Commission who predict at 1.1% growth and a progression of 1.7% in 2015. The US who are alike dealing with major government debt issues are however better at handling the economy with a growth rate for this year so far being 2.8% in comparison to the dismal 0.4% figure of the Eurozone.

No positives can be found either within Europe’s strongest and most influential countries, that of France and Germany. The growth of the German economy in the third quarter was down from 0.7% in the previous to 0.3% whereas France displayed a yet disappointing -0.1% which is identical to the third most important member state’s economy, that of Italy.